When Art By Women is Credited to Men

Learn About The Artists Obliterated from History at the NMWA Happy Hour

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Marie Denise Villers, Marie Joséphine Charlotte du Val d'Ognes, 1801, oil on canvas, 63 1/2 × 50 5/8 in. (161.3 × 128.6 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac D. Fletcher Collection, Bequest of Isaac D. Fletcher, 1917. Courtesy: NMWA http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437903

Join National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) Associate Curator Ginny Treanor and docent Carolyn Higgins for a virtual happy hour as they share artworks and stories about misattributions in the art world at the Virtual Happy Hour: Misattributions in the Art World.

You may wonder why so many great women artists are missing from history books. One reason is that art by many historical women was misattributed to male artists.

This phenomenon reaches back as far as certain prehistoric cave paintings—which recent studies suggest may have been made by women—through early modern women artists such as Judith Leyster (1609–1660) and Marie-Denise Villers (1774–1821), whose works were once attributed to men.

Learn about how these errors still affect our understanding of art history today. At the same time, learn some mixology as AJ Johnson, partner and bar director of Serenata (1280 Fourth St. NE), demonstrates how to make a specialty cocktail (or mocktail) in honor of these once-forgotten artists.

The event takes place online Wednesday, September 14, 5:30–6:30 p.m.. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about how to join. Tickets are free but consider making a donation – contribute what you can.

Learn more at NMWA.org